Successful Medications / Coping Mechanisms?

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Successful Medications / Coping Mechanisms?
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I've been living with trich for almost a decade now. Lately it has gotten so bad that I lose 4-5 hours a day picking my face and split ends. I am posting here to see if anyone has had any success with any medications or coping mechanisms?

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Hi, i pulled for about 22 years. I stopped 26 days and 22 hours ago.

Some strategies that worked for me:

Because I tend not to pull when I'm around other people, I committed to stop the day that I left to go on vacation with my boyfriend, because I was going to be around him pretty much constantly for the following two weeks. The distraction of a vacation also helps set aside the urges. Pulling doesn't even occur to me when I'm setting up a tent or riding my bike through a beautiful landscape, etc. so I went two weeks without pulling at all, without even having to try, and that helps a lot. I recommend it.

Once I got back to my routine, I was definitely more at risk, because it's by definition a more boring environment with lots of unstructured time. So I put in place phase 2 of the plan. Because pulling is such a sensory stimulus, I figured I should try to replace the response to the stimulus (pulling) with a different sensory stimulus. I made a list of things that would have a neutral or positive impact and still give my brain that sensory boost: chewing gum; taking a sip of icy flavoured water; putting on pleasant-smelling hand lotion (with the added benefit of making my fingers too slippery to pull); looking at a pretty image; listening to a song I love, etc. That's my battle plan for dealing with the urges when they come.

But I figured it's not enough to just deal with urges. I need to address my underlying anxiety also. And to do that, I'm spending a lot of time writing in my journal, because that's my way of analyzing my emotions and organizing my thoughts in a way that I can deal with them and cope with stress. I also sought out information, and read as much as I could about the disorder, its causes, its treatments, and the experiences of others.

I found online hypnosis videos specifically focused on trich, and I also downloaded soothing "nature-at-night" soundtracks to help calm me and help me fall asleep.

I made a plan to reward myself with a small treat after a certain amount of time has passed successfully pull-free, such as my favourite ice cream to celebrate one month, etc.

But the biggest factors for me are a) coming to the realization that there are many people like me who have this disorder, which has helped me to not feel ashamed of it (and myself) anymore, and b) getting to the point where I refuse to accept that this will be a part of my life moving forward, as opposed to thinking that this is just my reality and that it can never change. For me, it came down to no longer giving myself permission to settle for living like this.

I hope these things help you as well. Hang in there! You can do it!

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Last seen: 1 week 5 days ago
Joined: 08/31/2017 - 06:01
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Nep2ne wrote:

Hi, i pulled for about 22 years. I stopped 26 days and 22 hours ago.

Some strategies that worked for me:

Because I tend not to pull when I'm around other people, I committed to stop the day that I left to go on vacation with my boyfriend, because I was going to be around him pretty much constantly for the following two weeks. The distraction of a vacation also helps set aside the urges. Pulling doesn't even occur to me when I'm setting up a tent or riding my bike through a beautiful landscape, etc. so I went two weeks without pulling at all, without even having to try, and that helps a lot. I recommend it.

Once I got back to my routine, I was definitely more at risk, because it's by definition a more boring environment with lots of unstructured time. So I put in place phase 2 of the plan. Because pulling is such a sensory stimulus, I figured I should try to replace the response to the stimulus (pulling) with a different sensory stimulus. I made a list of things that would have a neutral or positive impact and still give my brain that sensory boost: chewing gum; taking a sip of icy flavoured water; putting on pleasant-smelling hand lotion (with the added benefit of making my fingers too slippery to pull); looking at a pretty image; listening to a song I love, etc. That's my battle plan for dealing with the urges when they come.

But I figured it's not enough to just deal with urges. I need to address my underlying anxiety also. And to do that, I'm spending a lot of time writing in my journal, because that's my way of analyzing my emotions and organizing my thoughts in a way that I can deal with them and cope with stress. I also sought out information, and read as much as I could about the disorder, its causes, its treatments, and the experiences of others.

I found online hypnosis videos specifically focused on trich, and I also downloaded soothing "nature-at-night" soundtracks to help calm me and help me fall asleep.

I made a plan to reward myself with a small treat after a certain amount of time has passed successfully pull-free, such as my favourite ice cream to celebrate one month, etc.

But the biggest factors for me are a) coming to the realization that there are many people like me who have this disorder, which has helped me to not feel ashamed of it (and myself) anymore, and b) getting to the point where I refuse to accept that this will be a part of my life moving forward, as opposed to thinking that this is just my reality and that it can never change. For me, it came down to no longer giving myself permission to settle for living like this.

I hope these things help you as well. Hang in there! You can do it!

What helpful and thoughtful comments! I think that I can get through this too! I went on vacation for Labor Day with a group of 5 and noticed I didn't hair pull 1/50th as much!